Sugar Maple Leaf 7.2.2017

Happy Canada Day – Maple Leaf

Yesterday was Canada Day.   A shout-out to my Canadian cousins!

Origami Maple Leaf 7.2.2017

Origami Maple Leaf 7.2.2017

Since a Maple leaf appears on the Canadian flag, I decided to fold an Origami Maple Leaf.

But, the Origami model in the tutorial did not look like the eleven-pointed leaf on the Canadian flag.

The more I studied the Origami design, the more I wondered:

“Is this just a very, very stylized version of the Maple leaf?”

I asked Dr. Google and what I found out was surprising.

Turns out that most of the Maples are specific to Asia!

Sugar Maple Leaf and Origami Maple Leaf 7.2.2017

Sugar Maple Leaf and Origami Maple Leaf 7.2.2017

The leaf I picked up from the tree near my house is from a Sugar Maple.

These trees can be found in Eastern North America and Canada.  Delicious maple syrup comes from the Sugar Maple tree.

Its leaves turn magnificent colors of red, burnt orange, and yellow during the Fall season.

The Origami model I folded resembles a leaf from a Japanese Maple with five points.

There are many varieties of Japanese Maples – some with red leaves.

This Origami model seems to resemble the Coral Bark Japanese Maple.

 

 

Monstrous Origami Creature 6.29.2017

Awful Origami Lion

“OK, you can fold this Origami Lion,” I thought, studying the YouTube picture.

OrigamiLion

I failed to take serious note that it was designed by an expert and folded by an expert.

After two hours of struggling to make my fingers manipulate the paper to this lion shape, I gave up with the result below.

Monstrous Origami Creature 6.29.2017

Monstrous Origami Creature 6.29.2017

Doesn’t it look rather like a partially emaciated bloodhound with a tongue half out of it’s mouth?

“What a monstrous Origami creature,” I muttered to myself then, tossed the thing into the trash.

 

Origami Kangaroo 6.24.2017

Hopping Out of Your Comfort Zone

Wow, an Origami Kangaroo!  It doesn’t look that hard, does it?

Origami Kangaroo 6.24.2017

Origami Kangaroo 6.24.2017

There are four paws, head and long tail.

Ha, it took me 1 1/2 hours to fold — with two five minute stretching breaks.

Origami Kangaroo 6.24.2017

Origami Kangaroo 6.24.2017

This was easily an intermediate model and I was clearly out of my comfort zone.

My neck and back began to hurt with the tension and concentration of folding.

The breaks from folding were an absolute necessity.

At one point, I almost abandoned folding this model.

I’m glad I didn’t.

Sometimes, it is good to challenge oneself with a more advanced fold.

 

 

Father’s Day Tall Ships

Seagulls strut along the dock.  A ship’s horn scares them and they scatter to the heavens.

Boston Ferry 6.18.2017

Boston Ferry 6.18.2017

Seagull 6.18.2017

Origami Seagull 6.18.2017

Our ferry passes Tall Ships.  We gape at the size of their masts.

We are informed of each vessel’s country and specifics of the complex rigging.

Schooners and smaller craft sail by.

More than 40 Tall Ships, decorated with a multitude of colorful flags, were on parade yesterday.   Today, the Tall Ships are at rest, sails folded.

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It’s Father’s Day and I am now fatherless.  My dad, Errol, died over ten years ago.

Errol was larger than life…bigger than these Tall Ships in my eyes.  Brilliance and hard work led to a full life in Academia.

With my mother, he brought me and my siblings to North America via the Caribbean, Africa and England.

In New England, we would have opportunities not available to us in the British West Indies.

“You’ve had your father your whole adult life,” a friend consoled me at his memorial service.

I did not realize it at the time but she was right.  I am grateful for his life.

 

 

 

Praying Mantis 5.13.2017

Praying Mantis – an Odd Looking Insect

I remember seeing a Praying Mantis in my mother’s garden in Barbados, West Indies, when I was a child.

The long slender insects with bulging eyes and front legs as if in prayer ate nuisance insects so adults told us to leave them alone.

Praying Mantis 5.13.2017

Praying Mantis 5.13.2017

Were they green, like this Origami Mantis, or light brown?  I’m not sure.

As children, we were fascinated by stories of how the female Praying Mantis would bite off the head of the male after mating.

The Origami model here is made from two sheets of paper.

The two models are folded independently but exactly the same.  Then, each model was modified; one to form the upper body and the other, the lower body.

It is quite neat how the bottom half of the insect slips under the folds of the upper half.  You can see this fold above the lower legs.

Stress Reliever c 4.21.2017

Origami Stress Reliever – Push, Pop, Push

The Origami Stress Reliever works.  Push – Pop – Push – Repeat.

You can see the “spring” action from the reverse of the model in the images below.

Starwarigami…what?

Yesterday, I discovered the fabulous world of Starwarigami!

Starwarigami is the art of folding objects from the Star Wars franchise.

I stumbled across a Moleskine email with free papercraft templates to download including an Origami X-Wing Starfighter Template.

Here is the X-Wing Starfighter from Star Wars VII folded from a dollar bill and another image of the model set against a starry background.

Moleskine is a vendor of beautifully designed but rather pricey notebooks.  Their motto is “Culture, travel, memory, imagination and personal identity.”  I carry a Moleskine notebook everywhere to record whatever pops into my head.

Russell, expert folder and Origami Expressions blogger, has a profile photo of an Origami Yoda perched on his head!

Maybe, when I become a better folder, I will try to fold Yoda.